Friday Morning Bookclub

October 25, 2014

Olive Kitteridge ………….A Miniseries!

Olive

I  am always intrigued when a book I have read is made into a movie. How closely will it follow the story line in the book? In the case of Olive Kitteridge I wonder how they will make an engaging movie out of what is essentially a group of short stories.I rarely read short stories and remember while reading Olive Kitteridge that some of the stories left me wanting more. Perhaps that is a good thing!

Olive Kitteridge was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 2009. The Friday Morning Bookclub read Olive Kitteridge in 2010 and gave it 3.25 omelets.

Here is a short review of the book, written by Carol:

The book is a collection of 13 vignettes of the lives of the residents of a small town in Maine. The residents weave in and out of each others’ lives to different degrees, but the one presence they all have in common is Olive Kitteridge, a lifelong resident of the town who is a schoolteacher, mother and wife. In these vignettes we see the different emotional challenges each of the characters must contend with and how they struggle to get the love they want. Olive’s life is the most detailed and the readers see how, over time, her different relationships either unravel or transform. The club was mixed in its’ feelings for the book; some of us really enjoyed examining these different characters and their intimate conflicts but some of us felt that the vignettes were too short and disconnected to be interesting. There was also different opinions about Olive and how responsible she was for pain she caused in the lives of her husband and son. There was a comment made that this book could be best appreciated by readers who are at least middle-aged, people who have reached a time in their lives when they know that sometimes different relationships require compromise or resignation. What I found intriguing about these stories were the differing strength of bonds between the various characters and their families and by examining these bonds I could ponder whose outcomes would be better than others’.

Sound interesting? Check out the trailer!  Part one of the HBO miniseries airs November 2nd at 9pm ET

\

Advertisements

February 11, 2010

The Friday Morning Bookclub Gives Olive Kitteridge 3 1/4 Omelets

Filed under: Olive Kitteridge,Rate The Book — susanbright @ 11:16 am

Amazon readers gave Olive Kitteridge 4 stars

Barnes and Noble readers gave Olive Kitteridge 4 stars

 Everyone at the Friday Morning Bookclub Meeting agreed that this was an excellent discussion/book club book. However there was a wide range of opinions as to just how good it was. Whereas a couple of people absolutely loved the book, one member actually disliked the book. Olive Kitteridge is a series of short stories and each story left some of us wanting more. Let us know what you think!

February 5, 2010

Olive Kitteridge By Elizabeth Strout

Filed under: Olive Kitteridge — susanbright @ 5:34 pm

 Carol wrote this review of today’s meeting. Thank you Carol!

Today we had a small group meet before the big storm to discuss Olive Kitterage. The book is a collection of 13 vignettes of the lives of the residents of a small town in Maine. The residents weave in and out of each others’ lives to different degrees, but the one presence they all have in common is Olive Kitterage, a lifelong resident of the town who is a schoolteacher, mother and wife. In these vignettes we see the different emotional challenges each of the characters must contend with and how they struggle to get the love they want. Olive’s life is the most detailed and the readers see how, over time, her different relationships either unravel or transform. The club was mixed in its’ feelings for the book; some of us really enjoyed examining these different characters and their intimate conflicts but some of us felt that the vignettes were too short and disconnected to be interesting. There was also different opinions about Olive and how responsible she was for pain she caused in the lives of her husband and son. There was a comment made that this book could be best appreciated by readers who are at least middle-aged, people who have reached a time in their lives when they know that sometimes different relationships require compromise or resignation. What I found intriguing about these stories were the differing strength of bonds between the various characters and their families and by examining these bonds I could ponder whose outcomes would be better than others’.

What did you think of Olive Kitteridge? Don’t forget to vote!

February 4, 2010

Rate The Book: Olive Kitteridge By Elizabeth Strout

Filed under: Olive Kitteridge,Polls,Rate The Book — susanbright @ 4:44 pm

Help us rate our books! All votes and comments are welcomed!

January 19, 2010

Colgate Living Writers: Meet Elizabeth Strout, Author Of Olive Kitteridge

Filed under: Colgate Living Writer's,Olive Kitteridge — susanbright @ 10:57 am

Here is a wonderful opportunity to go back to school once again and get to know the author of this month’s book as well as hear Strout read from her newest book Olive Kitteridge. Stay tuned for the question and answer session at the end.  This is worth watching! I just did!

://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hH80tzC6XU

January 5, 2010

Next Month’s Book: Olive Kitteridge

Filed under: Olive Kitteridge — susanbright @ 3:27 pm

Olive Kitteridge  is Elizabeth Strout’s third novel and like the other two is already a must read  book.  Strout’s first book  Amy and Isabelle, won the 1999 L.A. Times Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction. Her second book Abide With Me, became a best seller and in April, Strout was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in fiction for Olive Kitteridge. Elizabeth Strout grew up in New Hampshire and Maine,  graduated from Bates College and has a law degree and a Certificate of Gerontology from Syracuse University.

Olive Kitteridge is a collection of short stories about Olive, a seventh grade math teacher , her pharmacist husband Henry, their son Christopher and life in Crosby, Maine.

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: