Friday Morning Bookclub

August 2, 2009

Aravind Adiga Author Of The White Tiger Responds To Readers Questions

Filed under: Couples meetings,The White Tiger — susanbright @ 11:51 am

Here is an article you may want to share with your husbands who read The White Tiger and participated in April’s book club meeting.

Aravind

http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2009-07-30/aravind-adiga-responds-to-our-readers/?cid=hp:mainpromo7

4 Comments »

  1. I personally found the comment “As I write, I often have no idea where I’m going, or how I will finish a book, or whether I will finish it at all. This has happened with both books I’ve written, and will no doubt happen again.” as written by Adiga fascinating. In my brief “adventure” as a novelist (Soul Survivor, look for it on the discount shelf), I experienced a similar state of almost hypnotic steering of the story line. Of course, there is a subtle difference between our novels, his a blazing success and mine, a piece that I can only hope will get its due in several hundred years (when civilization will have evolved into beings of greater understanding of true literature.)

    With all due seriousness, I found the book fascinating.

    Comment by Edward Steiner — September 8, 2009 @ 10:38 pm | Reply

  2. Eddie,It is great to hear from one of the husbands! Try reading Homer & Langley. I think you will find it fascinating. Also we are open to suggestions for a good book to read in April for our annual couples meeting. We already read Soul Survivor (which we really enjoyed), so I guess you have to write another book!

    Comment by susanbright — September 9, 2009 @ 9:29 am | Reply

  3. I hear The Girl with the Dragon Tatoo by Stieg Larsson is a superb book and may have features that both the Men and Women may like…here is a brief review

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo,” by Stieg Larsson, a Swedish journalist who died of a heart attack in 2004, won’t help the country’s image any. The novel offers a thoroughly ugly view of human nature, especially when it comes to the way Swedish men treat Swedish women. In Larsson’s world, sadism, murder and suicide are commonplace — as is lots of casual sex.

    Comment by Edward Steiner — September 9, 2009 @ 9:40 am | Reply

    • We actually considered that one for last years meeting. I agree, that could be a good one!

      Comment by susanbright — September 9, 2009 @ 9:42 am | Reply


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